sabi sands 2016 _ 2643 by Alan Smith.

Two leopards

A few weeks ago I posted some photos of a leopard called Quarantine that I saw while staying at Cheetah Plains. Today, I thought I’d post some photos of two more of the leopards that we saw during our 4 days there. The first one was a female called Inkanyeni and the other was a large male called Tingana (which means “shy” in the Shangaan language).

sabi sands 2016 _ 2311 by Alan Smith.

Inkanyeni sits by a small puddle

sabi sands 2016 _ 2319 by Alan Smith.

She was quite a poser

We first saw Inkanyeni just before sunset and Andrew, our guide, thought that she might be returning to her cubs, which were known to be in the area.

sabi sands 2016 _ 2321 by Alan Smith.

Is this drinkable?

sabi sands 2016 _ 2305 by Alan Smith.

It’s better than nothing

She appeared to be more interested in finding some water to drink. Having taken a few sips from a very small puddle she moved on past another game viewing vehicle, showing just how small she is, before lying down close to where we had parked. Like most of the animals in the Sabi Sands reserve, she was totally unfazed by the presence of vehicles.

sabi sands 2016 _ 2325 by Alan Smith.

This photo shows just how small she is

sabi sands 2016 _ 2341 by Alan Smith.

She was unperturbed by the presence of vehicles

 

A little later she found a bigger puddle to help sate her thirst.

sabi sands 2016 _ 2337 by Alan Smith.

That’s a better sized puddle

We spent quite a bit of time with Inkanyeni and it was well after sunset when we left her to return to the lodge.

sabi sands 2016 _ 2346 by Alan Smith.

It was well after sunset by the time we left her

The next morning we met Tingana. He appears to be the new dominant male in the area and we found him feasting on a warthog that, Andrew thought, he had probably stolen from another cat.

sabi sands 2016 _ 2573 by Alan Smith.

MINE!!!

sabi sands 2016 _ 2634 by Alan Smith.

Tingana definitely likes pork

The carcass was under a bush and photographing him tearing into the still recognisable warthog proved to be challenging.

sabi sands 2016 _ 2590 by Alan Smith.

He stops eating briefly, giving us a view of his lightly blood-stained face (a sign that the warthog hadn’t been freshly killed)

sabi sands 2016 _ 2580 by Alan Smith.

He wasn’t the only thing enjoying the feast, it was covered in flies

Andrew manoeuvred us into a good position so that we could see Tingana at work. Even so, the harsh sunlight and the dappled shade still made photography difficult.

sabi sands 2016 _ 2636 by Alan Smith.

Using his paw to help steady the carcass

After a while the felid, his appetite sated, moved away from the remains of the hog and started to clean himself. All cats use a similar technique for their ablutions and Tingana was no exception.

The clean-up starts (Canon EOS 70D, 400mm, 1/160sec, f/8, ISO-400)

The clean-up starts (Canon EOS 70D, 400mm, 1/160sec, f/8, ISO-400)

Cats clean themselves the same way all over the World (Canon EOS 70D, 210mm, 1/400sec, f/8, ISO-400)

Cats clean themselves the same way all over the World (Canon EOS 70D, 210mm, 1/400sec, f/8, ISO-400)

Freshly cleaned, the large male demonstrated that he is anything but shy.

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\”Shy\” is a misnomer (Canon EOS 70D, 300mm, 1/125sec, f/8, ISO-400)

sabi sands 2016 _ 2627 by Alan Smith.

Tingana’s tail end this tale

sabi sands 2016 _ 172

Surviving against the odds

During our stay at Idube Lodge in the Sabi Sands Wildlife Reserve, we came across these three sub-adult lions. Their mother had been killed before she had a chance to teach them fully how to hunt.

Mrs Footprints getting some shots of the siblings

Mrs Footprints getting some shots of the siblings

Two of the siblings look for somewhere to rest

Two of the siblings look for somewhere to rest

The third preferred to keep its distance

The third preferred to keep its distance

Obviously they had learnt some skills because they were surviving without her. Some days before our arrival the trio, two females and a male, had managed to bring down a buffalo.

Drinking from a puddle

Drinking from a puddle

Even when drinking they were never fully relaxed

Even when drinking they were never fully relaxed

When we saw them the siblings were quite skinny and in need of another meal.

Just checking out what's going on

Just checking out what’s going on

Nothing much apparently

Nothing much apparently

Just having a wash

Just having a wash

Lions have rough tongues

Lions have rough tongues

If you can't beat them join them

If you can’t beat them join them

I might as well have a wash too!

I might as well have a wash too!

Not having learnt to hunt properly, these cats have developed their own hunting techniques. One of these involves chasing prey into the nearby boundary fence.

They operate close to the boundary fence

They operate close to the boundary fence

That looks tasty

That looks tasty

By operating on the periphery of the reserve, the three lions have reduced their chances of coming into conflict with other lions. With the Birmingham Coalition (more details about this group in a previous post) operating nearby, however, their future is not secure. The young male, in particular, is likely to be chased away by larger males and is unlikely to survive on his own.

Looking into an uncertain future

Looking into an uncertain future

The Flehmen response helps the lions to "sniff" the air and find out what other animals are around

The Flehmen response helps the lions to “sniff” the air and find out what other animals are around (this includes those that threaten them as well as those that might provide a possible meal and, when they’re older, a sexual partner)

They may be the king of beasts but it is a tough life being a lion.

Keeping a look-out

Keeping a look-out

Just keeping an eye on us

Just keeping an eye on us

Tired after a long night

Tired after a long night

sabi sands 2016 _ 2970

White rhinos of Sabi Sands

Rhinos may be one of the iconic Big 5* but sightings are becoming harder to come by. My early safari experiences with rhinoceri were in East Africa where the temperamental black rhino still rains supreme, even though, due to poaching, they have suffered a catastrophic decline in numbers.

Rhinos are one of the Big 5 game animals sought after by hunters and photographers alike

Rhinos are one of the Big 5 game animals sought after by hunters and photographers alike

I remember making a special trip in 1985 to Meru National Park to see, what were then, Kenya’s only white rhinos. Even then the northern white rhinoceros was all but extinct. The 5 or 6 rhino that we saw, which had been translocated there from South Africa, were all southern white rhinos – a different subspecies.

Enjoying a good wallow

Enjoying a good wallow

These animals were under guard 24 hours a day. As a result they weren’t afraid of humans. We were allowed to walk with them and pat them as they grazed. They were just like a small herd of cows. Just 3 years later they were all dead. Killed by poachers along with the brave men who guarded them.

On the road to extinction?

On the road to extinction?

I remembered this encounter when we came across five white rhinos on our first game drive in Sabi Sands. Four of them made up the main group and the fifth animal, a male, was grazing a short distance away.

A mother and her calf graze together in Sabi Sands

A mother and her calf graze together in Sabi Sands

This particular group of the pachyderms seemed to be happy to continue feeding around our vehicles. Others that we met merely tolerated our presence and would move away from the vehicles if they had a chance. A healthy fear of humans may help these animals to survive a little longer although, in the end, nothing can protect them from a poacher’s bullet.

Some of the animals preferred to keep their distance from us

Some of the animals preferred to keep their distance from us

The rhinos in Sabi seemed to be much bigger than the ones I remember from Kenya but that may just be my failing memory. Adult males can reach a height of 1.85m (6 feet) and weigh up to 1.7 tonnes. Some of the animals we saw were close to that size. It was awe-inspiring!

The wide lip of a white rhino helps it to graze

The wide lip of a white rhino helps it to graze

All the rhinos that we found in the park were white ones. They came in a variety of colours depending on what they have been rolling in, so the name is a misnomer. The “white” comes from a mis-anglicisation of the Afrikaan’s word “weit” which means wide and describes the difference between the square mouth of the white rhino and the more pointed lip of the black. This adaptation helps the white rhinos to feed as they mainly eat grass, the only rhino to do so. (It’s black cousin uses its more pointed lip when it browses for leaves from bushes.)

The white is the only sub-species of rhino that grazes

The white is the only sub-species of rhino that grazes

The southern white rhinoceros may not look quite as prehistoric as its Asian cousins but they can all trace their ancestry back 5 million years.

They have been around for 5 million years but can they survive the next few?

They have been around for 5 million years but can they survive the next few?

The white is the most populous of the rhino species left on Earth but there was a time, at the end of the 19th Century, when it was thought to have been hunted to extinction. In 1895, however, a small population of fewer than 100 individuals was discovered in Kwazulu-Natal. The 20,000 or so wild white rhinos that exist today are their descendants. Unfortunately, in spite of this conservation success story, the species is under threat once more, due to the current epidemic of poaching.

The white rhino is a conservation success story

The white rhino is a conservation success story

Poaching has been fuelled by an increase in demand from countries like Vietnam, where people use the horn as a status symbol (of their new-found wealth) or believe it has medicinal properties. Only when all humankind realises that rhino horn is no different to their fingernails and that it will not cure cancer or impotency, or whatever miracle use that has been attributed to it, will there be a chance of reducing demand. Let’s hope that realisation happens before it is too late for this iconic species.

Does this calf have a future?

Does this calf have a future?

Many of the facts included in this blog were obtained from the WWF website.

* The Big 5 (African elephant, rhino, Cape buffalo, lion and leopard) were originally the five animals that hunters most wanted to kill on safari. Now, they are often the animals that tourists most want to see.