sabi sands 2016 _ 172

Surviving against the odds

During our stay at Idube Lodge in the Sabi Sands Wildlife Reserve, we came across these three sub-adult lions. Their mother had been killed before she had a chance to teach them fully how to hunt.

Mrs Footprints getting some shots of the siblings

Mrs Footprints getting some shots of the siblings

Two of the siblings look for somewhere to rest

Two of the siblings look for somewhere to rest

The third preferred to keep its distance

The third preferred to keep its distance

Obviously they had learnt some skills because they were surviving without her. Some days before our arrival the trio, two females and a male, had managed to bring down a buffalo.

Drinking from a puddle

Drinking from a puddle

Even when drinking they were never fully relaxed

Even when drinking they were never fully relaxed

When we saw them the siblings were quite skinny and in need of another meal.

Just checking out what's going on

Just checking out what’s going on

Nothing much apparently

Nothing much apparently

Just having a wash

Just having a wash

Lions have rough tongues

Lions have rough tongues

If you can't beat them join them

If you can’t beat them join them

I might as well have a wash too!

I might as well have a wash too!

Not having learnt to hunt properly, these cats have developed their own hunting techniques. One of these involves chasing prey into the nearby boundary fence.

They operate close to the boundary fence

They operate close to the boundary fence

That looks tasty

That looks tasty

By operating on the periphery of the reserve, the three lions have reduced their chances of coming into conflict with other lions. With the Birmingham Coalition (more details about this group in a previous post) operating nearby, however, their future is not secure. The young male, in particular, is likely to be chased away by larger males and is unlikely to survive on his own.

Looking into an uncertain future

Looking into an uncertain future

The Flehmen response helps the lions to "sniff" the air and find out what other animals are around

The Flehmen response helps the lions to “sniff” the air and find out what other animals are around (this includes those that threaten them as well as those that might provide a possible meal and, when they’re older, a sexual partner)

They may be the king of beasts but it is a tough life being a lion.

Keeping a look-out

Keeping a look-out

Just keeping an eye on us

Just keeping an eye on us

Tired after a long night

Tired after a long night