sabi sands 2016 _ 321

Hippos

Meet the third deadliest animal in Africa (after humans and the mosquito), although you wouldn’t think so from the photo above. The humble hippopotamus may not look as fierce as a lion but it has a formidable armoury of teeth which it will display when it feels threatened – the hippo “yawn” beloved by photographers.

The hippos "yawn" is really a warning

The hippos “yawn” is really a warning

Most deaths are thought to occur, however, when people, using hippo tracks to collect water from rivers, startle the animal and are then trampled to death as it makes its escape.

They may be most comfortable in water but they can run on land and anything in the way is trampled underfoot

They may be most comfortable in water but they can run on land and anything in the way is trampled underfoot

We didn’t see many of this particular pachyderm during our time at the Sabi Sands. The rains were late this year and there hadn’t been enough to fill the dams, so most of the hippos had lived up to the “potamus” part of their name and returned to the rivers.

There was a clear gap between the buffalo and hippos, a sign of mutual respect

There was a clear gap between the buffalo and hippos, a sign of mutual respect

A "down the throat" shot

A “down the throat” shot

Following a herd of Cape buffalo to a waterhole one day did lead us to this pod (an alternative collective name is a “bloat”) of hippos.

Observing buffalo and hippos at a waterhole

Observing buffalo and hippos at a waterhole

Although some members of the pod showed concern at the intrusion (of the buffalo, not us), one remained totally unconcerned and continued its snooze, resting its huge head on the back of a smaller hippo – one river horse riding another.

"Anywhere I lay my head, boys, I will call my home" - Tom Waits

“Anywhere I lay my head, boys, I will call my home” – Tom Waits